Battle 57 The old Synth you never use

edited November 3 in Battles

I hope this theme wasn't used before...

Hello Op-1 users!

Probably many of you have equipment laying around that you've almost forgotten about or not used since years. :*

In this battle I want to encourage you to dig out your first or oldest synth, drummachine or acoustic instrument and use this as your main soundsource for your track.

In case you've been using exactly this instrument for many of your production until now or just recently, choose the one that's collecting dust because you don't like it or you prefer the other stuff.

Second thing is to use some samples of your latest music purchase whether it was a record, tape, CD or download file. You can but don't have to mention what artist/ song you sampled from.

-all tracks have to be done inside the OP-1 recorded to record a or b. Normalising and a bit of limiting with outside boards of the final track is also allowed.

-all engines, sampler, radio and mic are allowed to use.

Tell us about your hidden synth and much fun with that damn old thing from the attic o:)

Deadline until Sunday the 25th of November

Can you announce this? Thank you! @yoof

Comments

  • Hehe, great battle idea :) My abandoned and forgotten synth is a Korg Electribe EMX-1. Hopefully, I'll get some time to scrap away the layers of dust and bring it to life one more time ;-)

  • That would be great, for the battles and the electribe!

  • edited November 4

    Excellent !
    My OP-1 has felt a bit abandoned lately, but not as much as my little Shruthi-1...
    I already feel the need to pair them and see what I can get from assembling their sounds to the Jun Arasaki & 9 sheep EP I just got.

    Thx @mixrasta for this inspiring brief !

  • Using a synth that's collecting dust is a great idea for a lot of reasons 🙂
    I just bought 6 records & have a Volca FM collecting dust. This battle is meant to be, I can't pass it up!

  • Would be an honor to have you on board @LyingDalai
    Your next battle @Sharris Yo!
    And also @Spheric_El come and join the game!

  • Nice one!

  • I’ve got a £20 Casio keyboard in the attic I learnt on. Can I sample that?

  • Of course!

  • Something old and something new. I like it!

    It's been a while since I "battled." Almost a year. It's good to be back and I'm looking forward to hearing some creative tracks.

    I'm not really a synth guy, and I've never really had much synth gear over the years (was an in-the-box type of guy once I started producing). I do, however, have lots of acoustic instruments laying around that I don't play much. I decided to wipe the dust off my fender ukulele (literally) and wrote a little finger picking loop that is the main riff of the track. I bought a 25 cent cassette tape to sample that was a complete bust so I sampled myself taking the tape out, flipping it, and shutting the tape door again and used those sounds for percussion. Is that cheating? I leaned heavy on the CWO filter too (it's my absolute favorite) for some lofi tape wobble and dirty fake scratch sounds. Here's my side b. Maybe I'll try this challenge again with my old yard sale auto-harp and a fresh 25 cent tape, if that's allowed.

  • That's a supercool track you've done there! @KOHLBERG
    And it's all fine with the rules, no worries.
    You also can add a second track if you find the time.

  • edited November 11

    I hope I can come up with a decent track but so far I’ve been rediscovering my Shruthi and it’s been much fun !!!!
    :smiley:
    Very smart brief ;)

  • @KOHLBERG - nice stuff man. reminds me of some Gorillaz. i could imagine Damon getting vocally sappy all over that one. way to kick off a battle!

    @mixrasta - multiple tracks accepted. sweet!

  • edited November 12

    @KOHLBERG that track is a bloody corker

    Can you take us through your production process?

  • I started just by noodling around on the uke. When I had something I liked, I recorded a few takes of it, while listening to the tempo click separately in my phones. The riff has a part a and part b so I just found the best single-bar take of each part and dropped into the tape four times. I ended up with an nice and tight 8 bar uke loop. That part's important and it's worth taking the time to make sure it's right, being the foundation of the song.

    I always put my main riff (In this case the uke) on track 3. Next comes the drums, which I always put on track 1. I usually try to drop drums in by hand and avoid sequencers. I don't like them to sound too perfect/quantized. If things are a little late, or a little early, I don't sweat, as long as the vibe is right. Then I lay down my bass line, always on track 2 (the rhythm section needs to be near each other, right?), and that leaves track 4 for texturey, weird stuff like pads and complimentary leads. This way, once I have all my loops sounding' lovely, and I wanna freak it to vinyl, I know exactly where everything is at all times, and can drop things in and out confidently, no matter what song I'm working on.

    In this case, track 4 is my scratching sound. I think the main sound source was a piano or a synth, or something I found on op1.fun or something, but kind of organic sounding (not too video-gamey), manipulated with the CWO. If you set everything at 0, and then mess with the feedback (green encoder), it produces extremely cool lo-fi junky, tape warble effects and if you really crank on her, it sounds like a turntable. The tricky part is starting recording, then quickly switching to the sound's effects screen so you can do what you need to do. Sometimes it sound stupid, or off-time, so you gotta do a lot of takes, and keep the best parts, but the end result is cool.

    Once you've got a solid 8 bar loop, you can duplicate it, remove something prominent (like the scratching) and add something else more ambient/low key instead, which makes for a good verse part or something. I typically produce hip hop, so I try to imagine a rapper or singer coming in. I want to put it on a tee for them, and leave some frequencies free for a human voice. You can do this all day, duplicating, removing, re-adding, essentially frog-hopping your way down the tape. At the end of the day you should have at least a few solid loops to shuffle through. The fun part is committing it to vinyl, and figuring out a little routine to snake your way through the loops and have it all flow.

    Sorry for the long-winded answer. It's probably pretty basic, compared to some of you guys, but I'm always interested in reading about other people's workflows too. I've got some good ideas more than once in doing so. I'd love to hear from others regarding this.

    Cheers, teenagers.
    Kohlberg

  • Very interesting, and a good long report! @KOHLBERG
    I usually use the value Lfo for scratching, so I'll try the Cow next time. In the last battle I used the tapetricks towards the vinyl and back to tape. Thanks!

  • @KOHLBERG said:
    I started just by noodling around on the uke. When I had something I liked, I recorded a few takes of it, while listening to the tempo click separately in my phones. The riff has a part a and part b so I just found the best single-bar take of each part and dropped into the tape four times. I ended up with an nice and tight 8 bar uke loop. That part's important and it's worth taking the time to make sure it's right, being the foundation of the song.

    I always put my main riff (In this case the uke) on track 3. Next comes the drums, which I always put on track 1. I usually try to drop drums in by hand and avoid sequencers. I don't like them to sound too perfect/quantized. If things are a little late, or a little early, I don't sweat, as long as the vibe is right. Then I lay down my bass line, always on track 2 (the rhythm section needs to be near each other, right?), and that leaves track 4 for texturey, weird stuff like pads and complimentary leads. This way, once I have all my loops sounding' lovely, and I wanna freak it to vinyl, I know exactly where everything is at all times, and can drop things in and out confidently, no matter what song I'm working on.

    In this case, track 4 is my scratching sound. I think the main sound source was a piano or a synth, or something I found on op1.fun or something, but kind of organic sounding (not too video-gamey), manipulated with the CWO. If you set everything at 0, and then mess with the feedback (green encoder), it produces extremely cool lo-fi junky, tape warble effects and if you really crank on her, it sounds like a turntable. The tricky part is starting recording, then quickly switching to the sound's effects screen so you can do what you need to do. Sometimes it sound stupid, or off-time, so you gotta do a lot of takes, and keep the best parts, but the end result is cool.

    Once you've got a solid 8 bar loop, you can duplicate it, remove something prominent (like the scratching) and add something else more ambient/low key instead, which makes for a good verse part or something. I typically produce hip hop, so I try to imagine a rapper or singer coming in. I want to put it on a tee for them, and leave some frequencies free for a human voice. You can do this all day, duplicating, removing, re-adding, essentially frog-hopping your way down the tape. At the end of the day you should have at least a few solid loops to shuffle through. The fun part is committing it to vinyl, and figuring out a little routine to snake your way through the loops and have it all flow.

    Sorry for the long-winded answer. It's probably pretty basic, compared to some of you guys, but I'm always interested in reading about other people's workflows too. I've got some good ideas more than once in doing so. I'd love to hear from others regarding this.

    Cheers, teenagers.
    Kohlberg

    Dude thankyou for this explanation! Green knob on cwo to scratch. I can't wait to try it. I don't think it's in the tips and tricks thread. Definitely worthy.

  • Yea that's crazy the scratchin was made with the cow. Great track @KOHLBERG & thanks for filling us in on your process!

  • Was able to scramble up another beat with another 25 cent piano tape and an old acoustic guitar. Also scratched up some old robot gibberish from an old retro sci-fi flick. Well, I never!

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