What's my problem?

I own many keyboards, application DAWs, VSTs, interfaces, acoustic and electric guitars, effects units and an OP-1. If anyone asks me what is my favorite instrument, I unequivocally tell them every time "The OP-1!"

But there it sits on my desk, unused, with minimal time spent creating with what I consider the most powerful tool I own. Why? 

Discuss. :) 

Comments

  • Can't answer this very well... I have to fight the constant urge to bust out Morgan for a strap, so I can get bizness done.

    Do you travel much? It might help to go on a trip with only the OP
  • You have too much stuff
  • I do agree with lescour1... Having too many things can definitely have this kind of effect. I know that I'm becoming more productive and interested in the things I own since I started scaling down. Too many things cluttered my vision. Less is more.

    Then again, I can imagine other scenarios. I don't know how proficient you are worth all these instruments bit for me, learning to use the OP-1 is a challenge. I mean not just "push buttons" and create "ambiance" but learning to really use this thing. So it requires effort on my part.

    Also, what would be your GOAL with the OP-1? Without a goal, it's hard to be motivated...
  • You know what, to ellaborate....I've been a ableton user for years, owned Push, Push 2, launchpads, launchkeys, as many VSTs you can shake a stick at. You know how many tracks I actually FINISHED in the space of a year? Zero. This prompted me to buy a Novation Circuit....and boom I got hooked. Music was flowing out of me because of the limitations and addictive workflow. This prompted me to eventually sell Circuit and buy OP1, and I've never looked back. Finished more music than ever, mainly just recording to album and mixing/mastering on the OP1. Ok it's not the most sonically professional, it's not EQd and edited down to the last hi hat or bass note. But it's got character.

    So anyway to fast forward because of this relative success creatively I got a addicted to hardware! Ive since owned an octatrack, analog four amd organelle. All of which have since gone and I've actually gone full circle and ordered my second Circuit.

    Morale of the story less is more. We are human beings, most of us cannot handle more than 1 or 2 things at once and give our all to each element. The OP1 on its own is a depot device despite limitations. Own it, use it, get better at it and make better music, more often.
  • You know what, to ellaborate....I've been a ableton user for years, owned Push, Push 2, launchpads, launchkeys, as many VSTs you can shake a stick at. You know how many tracks I actually FINISHED in the space of a year? Zero. This prompted me to buy a Novation Circuit....and boom I got hooked. Music was flowing out of me because of the limitations and addictive workflow. This prompted me to eventually sell Circuit and buy OP1, and I've never looked back. Finished more music than ever, mainly just recording to album and mixing/mastering on the OP1. Ok it's not the most sonically professional, it's not EQd and edited down to the last hi hat or bass note. But it's got character.

    So anyway to fast forward because of this relative success creatively I got a addicted to hardware! Ive since owned an octatrack, analog four amd organelle. All of which have since gone and I've actually gone full circle and ordered my second Circuit.

    Morale of the story less is more. We are human beings, most of us cannot handle more than 1 or 2 things at once and give our all to each element. The OP1 on its own is a deep device despite limitations....imagine 15 years ago if someone had told you that something like OP1 existed?! You would have laughed at the possibility of such a complex little machine.

    Own it, use it, get better at it and make better music, more often.
  • Oops not sure why I managed to quote myself! !
  • ...what would be your GOAL with the OP-1? Without a goal, it's hard to be motivated...
    This is key.
    Oops not sure why I managed to quote myself! !
    Haha, cause you said some good shit. Someone had to quote it.
  • Can't answer this very well... I have to fight the constant urge to bust out Morgan for a strap, so I can get bizness done.

    Do you travel much? It might help to go on a trip with only the OP
    Yes, this is my favorite use, last year during our very busy travel scheudule, of the op-1. I particularly love getting radio stations of the places we visit and sampling local flavors!

    We will be going to Scotland in April and back to Las Vegas in May, so I'll take it then for sure. But I tend not to take it for our camping trips, worried about it getting damaged.
  • You have too much stuff
    Good point. I've actually been selling off a lot of it. The keyboards I have now are all keepers, since the System-8 sold this last week. I have a Behringer DeepMind 12 on the way but I think I'm keyboarded out for now!
  • I do agree with lescour1... Having too many things can definitely have this kind of effect. I know that I'm becoming more productive and interested in the things I own since I started scaling down. Too many things cluttered my vision. Less is more.

    Then again, I can imagine other scenarios. I don't know how proficient you are worth all these instruments bit for me, learning to use the OP-1 is a challenge. I mean not just "push buttons" and create "ambiance" but learning to really use this thing. So it requires effort on my part.

    Also, what would be your GOAL with the OP-1? Without a goal, it's hard to be motivated...
    I agree, the goal is a good way to go. Also, you're right about it being a challenge to REALLY learn and use the OP-1 properly. I end up creating music with my other instruments because each is a dedicated unit (i.e. Casio CZ1000 plays one sound, usually a lead; Yamaha DX11 plays bass sounds really well; TR-8 is so tactile and easy to set up rhythm; I use my Juno stage to arpeggiate the CZ or DX, so I'm not always playing on it.). I end up recording live to digital two track via my Zoom LiveTrak L-12 instead of losing my creative moment having to deal with a DAW.

    All of this could be done on the OP-1, that's what's so amazing about it, isn't it! I just need to cover the others, and just concentrate on OP-1 this year... After I get the DeepMind 12 and spend some time with that... 

    Then, it will be summer, where I usually play mostly acoustic instruments with others. Might be nice to figure out a way to incorporate OP-1 into that this year!
  • You know what, to ellaborate....I've been a ableton user for years, owned Push, Push 2, launchpads, launchkeys, as many VSTs you can shake a stick at. You know how many tracks I actually FINISHED in the space of a year? Zero. This prompted me to buy a Novation Circuit....and boom I got hooked. Music was flowing out of me because of the limitations and addictive workflow. This prompted me to eventually sell Circuit and buy OP1, and I've never looked back. Finished more music than ever, mainly just recording to album and mixing/mastering on the OP1. Ok it's not the most sonically professional, it's not EQd and edited down to the last hi hat or bass note. But it's got character.

    So anyway to fast forward because of this relative success creatively I got a addicted to hardware! Ive since owned an octatrack, analog four amd organelle. All of which have since gone and I've actually gone full circle and ordered my second Circuit.

    Morale of the story less is more. We are human beings, most of us cannot handle more than 1 or 2 things at once and give our all to each element. The OP1 on its own is a depot device despite limitations. Own it, use it, get better at it and make better music, more often.
    I also agree with you Lesour1. I went down the path of owning all the Roland AIRA gear only to find out that it doesn't all work great together, then decided I didn't want to do a live set, even though it's fun for me at home to come up with ideas that way. 
    I am finally done with selling off all of that except the MX-1 and TR-8. Those are keepers! The MX-1 is my keyboard mixer but it's an instrument in it's own right. Love that thing! I got the DeepMind 12 for a very low low price, so if I don't care for it, it will sell.

    Your final advice I will definitely take "Own it, use it, get better at it and make better music, more often." Thanks!
  • edited March 12
    I guess if you look at people's studios, there are hundreds of pieces of gear. the ability to walk up to an instrument and get some sound going turns into a powerful creative force. Not having to get rid of one thing to buy another is a luxury of sorts, today the pressure for money or space is high. 

    With the OP1 there's the extra friction. There's a shape to the OP1's process that might not fit everyone's mind. It's different to whole classes of musical instruments. But it's also far from perfect.

    Ideally we want all the things - an always-ready DAW, a sizeable playground with always-on, always-audible pieces of kit that sound crazy-good, infinitely flexible routing, many and sweet FX, and to always be recording. That rarely happens. And the thing is I don't think it's fixable with gear. But a careful "find it, buy it, keep it" process and a determination to settle with just a bunch of instruments that fit your mindset tightly, and that you trust, and that are sonically complete and stable, should eventually get you to a happy place. On the other hand, buying on the basis of low cost is nice exploration but is also distracting.

  • I guess if you look at people's studios, there are hundreds of pieces of gear. the ability to walk up to an instrument and get some sound going turns into a powerful creative force. Not having to get rid of one thing to buy another is a luxury of sorts, today the pressure for money or space is high. 

    With the OP1 there's the extra friction. There's a shape to the OP1's process that might not fit everyone's mind. It's different to whole classes of musical instruments. But it's also far from perfect.

    Ideally we want all the things - an always-ready DAW, a sizeable playground with always-on, always-audible pieces of kit that sound crazy-good, infinitely flexible routing, many and sweet FX, and to always be recording. That rarely happens. And the thing is I don't think it's fixable with gear. But a careful "find it, buy it, keep it" process and a determination to settle with just a bunch of instruments that fit your mindset tightly, and that you trust, and that are sonically complete and stable, should eventually get you to a happy place. On the other hand, buying on the basis of low cost is nice exploration but is also distracting.

    WOW!!!!!! Incredibly on point!!!! I feel like this should be the mantra for @flyingace71 and many other thousands of music makers including myself. I am thinking along the same lines but could never articulate it like you have just done.

    This should be the affirmation. It should serve as a clear goal in your minds eye. If you find yourself wondering from it then refer back to this thread.

    I sold my A4... my OP-1 last year... overall, I felt guilty for having them when I didn’t use them to their full potential. I’m happy I don’t have that burden and feel more focused with dedicated pieces of equipment. 6 synths... 2 drum machines... funny little bit of semi-modular... and a bunch of dedicated outboard effects has me covered more than enough for what makes it into a recording.

    Again, to quote the golden insights of the one above... “I don't think it's fixable with gear. But a careful "find it, buy it, keep it" process and a determination to settle with just a bunch of instruments that fit your mindset tightly, and that you trust, and that are sonically complete and stable, should eventually get you to a happy place.“


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